2015 Fantasy Baseball, Week 13 Tools of the Trade

TheFantasyFix.com’s “Tools of the Trade” is a unique guide for owners to use while attempting to make an even trade with their league-mates in a standard 12-team mixed, 5×5 head-to-head or rotisserie redraft league.

The values present in this guide are simply the basis for a trade. A full-blown analysis of each team’s strengths and weaknesses are essential prior to proposing or accepting a trade offer.

How to use the guide: Ideally, owners will agree to a trade that will aid both sides and stay within $2-3 of each other in a one-for-one and $4-5 in a multi-player deal, according to our chart. Players not noted should be considered $1 players.

Here’s the chart:

You can also download the chart, here.

Trading isn’t easy. It’s fun, but not easy. Remember that you don’t have to “win” the trade in order to pull the trigger. If you’re improving your team, then you should make the deal.

Have a question about our Week 13 Tools of the Trade? Leave it in the comments below.

The concept for the this trade value chart has been adapted from Dave Richard’s fantasy football work at CBS.

All of our statistics are courtesy of our friends at FanGraphs .

Daily Fantasy Dartboard: June 16, 2015

We’re really excited to announce a new venture here at TheFantasyFix.com. Every Tuesday and Friday, Charles Kurz and Matt L’Heureux will be running a video podcast, dissecting the largest MLB slates of the week for daily fantasy players at DraftKings.

This video podcast will be an excellent complement to our Daily Fantasy Baseball Strategy articles published each-and-every morning, which you can find here. Please give each of these guys a follow on Twitter by clicking the link on their respective names above.

DK Banner 728x90

2015 Fantasy Baseball, Week 10 Tools of the Trade

TheFantasyFix.com’s “Tools of the Trade” is a unique guide for owners to use while attempting to make an even trade with their league-mates in a standard 12-team mixed, 5×5 head-to-head or rotisserie redraft league.

The values present in this guide are simply the basis for a trade. A full-blown analysis of each team’s strengths and weaknesses are essential prior to proposing or accepting a trade offer.

How to use the guide: Ideally, owners will agree to a trade that will aid both sides and stay within $2-3 of each other in a one-for-one and $4-5 in a multi-player deal, according to our chart. Players not noted should be considered $1 players.

Here’s the chart:

DK Banner 728x90

You can also download the chart, here.

Trading isn’t easy. It’s fun, but not easy. Remember that you don’t have to “win” the trade in order to pull the trigger. If you’re improving your team, then you should make the deal.

Analysis on the chart will follow…

Have a question about our Week 10 Tools of the Trade? Leave it in the comments below.

The concept for the this trade value chart has been adapted from Dave Richard’s fantasy football work at CBS.

All of our statistics are courtesy of our friends at FanGraphs .

Fantasy Baseball Dartboard: June 12, 2015

We’re really excited to announce a new venture here at TheFantasyFix.com. Every Tuesday and Friday, Charles Kurz and Matt L’Heureux will be running a video podcast, dissecting the largest MLB slates of the week for daily fantasy players at DraftKings.

This video podcast will be an excellent complement to our Daily Fantasy Baseball Strategy articles published each-and-every morning, which you can find here. Please give each of these guys a follow on Twitter by clicking the link on their respective names above.

DK Banner 728x90

 

 

Daily Fantasy Dartboard: June 9, 2015

We’re really excited to announce a new venture here at TheFantasyFix.com. Every Tuesday and Friday, Charles Kurz and Matt L’Heureux will be running a video podcast, dissecting the largest MLB slates of the week for daily fantasy players at DraftKings.

This video podcast will be an excellent complement to our Daily Fantasy Baseball Strategy articles published each-and-every morning, which you can find here. Please give each of these guys a follow on Twitter by clicking the link on their respective names above.

DK Banner 728x90

Minor League Buzz: Carlos Correa, Vincent Velasquez & Francisco Lindor

Carlos Correa, Major League Baseball’s number one overall draft pick in 2012, provided enough punishment to his Minor League opponents to start the 2015 season and is on his way to Houston to join the parent club. In 53 games between Double-A Corpus Christi of the Texas League and Triple-A Fresno of the Pacific Coast League, Correa triple slashed .335/.407/.600 10 home runs, 18 stolen bases, 44 runs scored and 44 batted in.

And Correa did all this in pretty good form, too. The Astros’ shortstop displayed the speed and power combo while still being selective at the plate — Correa maintained at least a 10% BB% or better at each stop through the minors since 2013 — and not being overly aggressive — he never struck out more than 18.8% over that same time frame. This may be somewhat apples and oranges, but for comparison fun, Joey Gallo owns a career 48.1% K% and Joc Pederson owns a 29.9% K% while they both take their fair share of walks.
[Read more…]

Daily Fantasy Dartboard: June 5, 2016

We’re really excited to announce a new venture here at TheFantasyFix.com. Every Tuesday and Friday, Charles Kurz and Matt L’Heureux will be running a video podcast, dissecting the largest MLB slates of the week for daily fantasy players at DraftKings.

This video podcast will be an excellent complement to our Daily Fantasy Baseball Strategy articles published each-and-every morning, which you can find here. Please give each of these guys a follow on Twitter by clicking the link on their respective names above.

DK Banner 728x90

We hope you enjoy. If you have an questions, comments or feedback regarding this new feature at TheFantasyFix.com, please drop us a note in the comments.

2015 Fantasy Baseball, Week 9 Tools of the Trade: A.J. Pollock On The Rise

TheFantasyFix.com’s “Tools of the Trade” is a unique guide for owners to use while attempting to make an even trade with their league-mates in a standard 12-team mixed, 5×5 head-to-head or rotisserie redraft league.

The values present in this guide are simply the basis for a trade. A full-blown analysis of each team’s strengths and weaknesses are essential prior to proposing or accepting a trade offer.

How to use the guide: Ideally, owners will agree to a trade that will aid both sides and stay within $2-3 of each other in a one-for-one and $4-5 in a multi-player deal, according to our chart. Players not noted should be considered $1 players.

Here’s the chart:

DK Banner 728x90

 

You can also download the chart, here.

Trading isn’t easy. It’s fun, but not easy. Remember that you don’t have to “win” the trade in order to pull the trigger. If you’re improving your team, then you should make the deal.

In week nine’s version of the trade chart, we see Miguel Cabrera fall out of the top one or two spots for the first time in a few seasons. The answer to your question is no, I’m not down on Cabrera. He’s triple slashing .333/.435/.569 with 11 homers and 36 batted in. Cabrera’s walk rate is up to over 14% and he’s striking out at a 17.2% clip, just a hair over his 16.9% career strikeout rate. This is one of those situations in which I’d slightly rather the speed that Paul Goldschmidt or Anthony Rizzo would provide your team.

A.J. Pollok has been outstanding so far this season. I really think he’s one of this year’s first-half heroes — and he’s not getting nearly the attention that he should. Pollock is triple slashing .322/.3673/.495 with seven homers, 31 runs scored, 23 runs batted in and 13 stolen bases. His home run per fly ball rate sits at a career-high 14.3% (career average 9.1%), so there’s been a bit of luck involved in these first few months. Both Steamer and ZiPS believe Pollock is good for another eight homers along with 13 or 14 swipes the rest of the way. The chart thinks you might be able to pull Joc Pederson straight up in a redraft format, so if you need a bit more power than speed the rest of the way, that’s not a bad deal to make — if you can swing it.

Have a question about our Week 9 Tools of the Trade? Leave it in the comments below.

The concept for the this trade value chart has been adapted from Dave Richard’s fantasy football work at CBS.

All of our statistics are courtesy of our friends at FanGraphs .

2015 Fantasy Baseball, Week 8 Tools of the Trade

TheFantasyFix.com’s “Tools of the Trade” is a unique guide for owners to use while attempting to make an even trade with their league-mates in a standard 12-team mixed, 5×5 head-to-head or rotisserie redraft league.

The values present in this guide are simply the basis for a trade. A full-blown analysis of each team’s strengths and weaknesses are essential prior to proposing or accepting a trade offer.

How to use the guide: Ideally, owners will agree to a trade that will aid both sides and stay within $2-3 of each other in a one-for-one and $4-5 in a multi-player deal, according to our chart. Players not noted should be considered $1 players.

Here’s the chart:

DK Banner 728x90

You can also download the chart, here.

Trading isn’t easy. It’s fun, but not easy. Remember that you don’t have to “win” the trade in order to pull the trigger. If you’re improving your team, then you should make the deal.

Have a question about our Week 8 Tools of the Trade? Leave it in the comments below.

The concept for the this trade value chart has been adapted from Dave Richard’s fantasy football work at CBS.

All of our statistics are courtesy of our friends at FanGraphs .

Fantasy Baseball Tips of the Trade: Part Two

Pulling off a fantasy baseball trade during the season can sometimes be a laborious task, but if owners are willing to put together a worthy offer for their opponents, the process is not only enjoyable, it could be beneficial for your and your opponent’s’ roster either in the short or long-term, or both.

This is the second effort in a series of pieces that we will put together here at TheFantasyFix.com to let you know how we approach this aspect of the fantasy baseball game. If you’d like to take a look back at the first piece regarding “Knowing Your League/Opponents” and “Communication” you can see it here. As always, enjoy. And if you have any feedback, please let me know in the comments.

Analyze the Standings, Your Team and Their Team

This should be common sense to most by now, but you’d be surprised. If this is common sense to you, simply consider this a brief review.

Too many fantasy baseball players — even in “expert leagues” — fail to do their homework before proposing a swap to their counterparts. The process should not take an exorbitant amount of effort or consume an excess amount of your time, so instead of leaving your potential trade partner scratching their heads, do yourself a favor: analyze the standings, analyze your team and definitely analyze their team.

I don’t love it when people bring up their home leagues, but I’m going to do it again right now. And I’m doing so because there is a recent example of a trade that made sense and an offer I recently received that didn’t make sense, for me anyway. Two buddies, both named Adam, have hooked up in the past for quite a few trades, so they have a good “business” relationship going on in this league, the kind of relationship I suggested you build in last week’s column. Anyway, Adam sent Shelby Miller along with Dellin Betances for Adam’s Justin Upton back on May 1st. It doesn’t exactly sound even, but the move made sense for both teams based on roster construction and has in fact helped both teams in the short-term.  The reason this trade worked is this: One team needed a starter and a reliever, while the other needed an outfielder. Each team was dealing from excess both on their roster and in category production. It just made sense. Many will say the team that hauled in Justin Upton will win in the long run — and that very well may be true — but based on team’s needs, they both won (for now).

Conversely, I received an offer in a deeper mixed league of his Billy Hamilton for my Chris Archer. Sounds pretty square from a value standpoint. But if you dissect the standings and my team’s roster make-up, you’d see that this failed to meet my team’s needs. I’m struggling in batting average, homers and runs batted in, but am in the top third in the league in stolen bases. On the pitching end, I’m doing well in saves, but don’t have enough wins or strikeouts. This is simply the case of a pretty fair offer that didn’t make sense for my squad at the time. Sure, I could’ve turned around and flipped Billy Hamilton to a team that needed swipes, or, I could’ve just held onto Chris Archer, benefit from the wins, strikeouts and ratios or simply used him as trade bait (which I ended up doing).

Before making an offer, I always look at the standings to see how my team is performing. Then I’ll run a comparison to see how my team is performing compared to each of my opponents, in each category. I’ll also take a look to see if a team is underperforming beacuse they have a few guys on the disabled list, or maybe just a few guys underperforming in general. I’ll use FanGraphs to look at the underlying numbers (ISO, BABIP, BB% & K% etc…) of specific players and then compare it to their rest of season projections according to Steamer and ZiPS. Just researching here. Looking for any positive or negative signs that may reflect player production.

For example, if my team only has one point in the wins and strikeout categories in a 12-team league, I’m not going to look for starting pitchers I like on a team that has two or three points in the same categories, I’m going to target teams that have 10, 11 or even 12 points. Once I identify those teams, I’ll do an analysis of their roster to see where I believe they could improve from a positional standpoint, then see if I have a trade chip that could be of use to them at that position in addition to the category.

A league mate was in the top three overall in the league, with 10, 11, or 12 points in wins, strikeouts and ratios, but only two points in saves. I sat in the top third in saves and have an excess of relief arms that could potentially claim some scab saves here-and-there. Saves are really hard to come by in this deep, 12-team, 40-man roster mixed league. And that’s how the discussion started. I ended up turning Francisco Rodriguez into Dallas Keuchel. Seems like a coup for me, because it was. But it was also a coup for him because he still had Clayton Kershaw, Felix Hernandez, Jacob deGrom and Collin McHugh among others. Sure the loss of Keuchel stings a bit, but in the grand scheme of things, he had a fair lead in the categories that starting pitchers contribute to. He was able to trade from excess and acquire someone who could see a lot of save opportunities going forward. It may sound a bit lopsided, but both teams achieved their goals.

To recap:

  1. Analyze the standings.
  2. Identify your team’s strengths and weaknesses in both categories/positional depth.
  3. Identify a team that could benefit from your team’s strengths.
  4. See if any of those teams can help you improve your category/positional weaknesses.
  5. Communicate your findings to potential trade partners.
  6. Execute.
  7. Don’t let minor details/hang ups keep you from improving your team.
  8. Don’t feel like you have to “win the trade.” Improving your team is winning.